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Posts tagged with "science!"

science-junkie:

How to make instant ice | Do Try This At Home

Watch water transform instantly into ice! Eddie shows you how to make super-cooled water in this great experiment to try at home.

thereconstructionists:

Not only did Scottish mathematician, science writer, and polymath Mary Fairfax Somerville (December 26, 1780—November 28, 1872) defy the era’s deep-seated bias against women in science, she was the very reason the word “scientist” was coined: When reviewing her seminal second book, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences, which Somerville wrote at the age of 54, English polymath and Trinity College master William Whewell was so impressed that he thought it rendered the term “men of science” obsolete and warranted a new, more inclusive descriptor to honor Somerville’s contribution to the field.
Reconstructionist Maria Mitchell, herself a pioneer who paved the way for women in science, captured Somerville’s singular genius in a May 1860 article for The Atlantic:

To read mathematical works is an easy task; the formulae can be learned and their meaning apprehended: to read the most profound of them, with such appreciation that one stands side by side with the great minds who originated them, requires a higher order of intellect; and far-reaching indeed is that which, pondering in the study on a few phenomena known by observation, develops the theory of worlds, traces back for ages their history, and sketches the outline of their future destiny.

Somerville came to science by way of the arts, the era’s traditional domain for young girls. When her art teacher made a passing reference to Euclid and his theories of geometry to explain perspective in painting, noting that they also illuminated the foundations of astronomy and physics, young Mary found herself mesmerized by the promise of a science so expansive and dimensional. So she pleaded with her brother’s science tutor to help her learn about Euclid. But her ascent to science was far from smooth — this early initiative was met with adamant resistance by her father, who found mathematics not only unsuitable but also sanity-jeopardizing for his daughter. Somerville recalls in her journals:

My father came home for a short time, and, somehow or other, finding out what I was about, said to my mother, ‘Peg, we must put a stop to this, or we shall have Mary in a strait jacket one of these days. There was X., who went raving mad about the longitude!’

To correct young Mary’s intellectual aberrations, her parents put her on a steady diet of illustrated ladies’ journals. But those happened to contain puzzles and logical riddles, many of which required mathematical solutions. It was in them that Mary discovered the curious symbols of algebraic equations and was once again enthralled.
Rather than thwarting her budding crush on mathematics, her parents had inadvertently turned it into a lifelong love.
Even so, however, they were bent on sending their daughter down the traditional path destined for women of the era. When she was twenty-four, Mary was married to her distant cousin, Samuel Grieg — a severe man with little faith in women’s capacities beyond their childbearing ability, who forbad Mary from pursuing her studies.
When Grieg died three years later, he left Somerville with two young children, but also with an inheritance and a freedom that opened a new horizon for learning. She soon began corresponding with the mathematician William Wallace at the University of Edinburgh, who mentored her studies in math and astronomy as she at last indulged her intellectual calling.
In 1832, Somerville married another cousin, Dr. William Somerville — a bright and gentle man who thought the world of her, encouraged her studies, and relentlessly helped her master the physical sciences. After the couple moved to London, along with their four children and the two boys from the previous marriage, Somerville met some of the era’s greatest scientific minds, from legendary astronomer William Herschel to computing pioneer Charles Babbage. It was there she became the first mathematical tutor of reconstructionist Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer, thus illustrating the beautiful daisy chain of brilliance that unfolds when the hunger for knowledge is set free from the shackles of stereotypes and cultural norms.
In 1835, Somerville and Caroline Herschel, sister of William Herschel and a trailblazing astronomer in her own right, became the first female members of the Royal Astronomical Society.
Above all, however, Somerville embodied the richness of mind and spirit that marks out the true scientist. Maria Mitchell, who had met her in 1858, poignantly observes in her Atlantic essay:

No one can make the acquaintance of this remarkable woman without increased admiration for her. The ascent of the steep and rugged path of science has not unfitted her for the drawing-room circle; the hours of devotion to close study have not been incompatible with the duties of the wife and the mother; the mind that has turned to rigid demonstration has not thereby lost its faith in the truths which figures will not prove.

Learn more: Personal Recollections, from Early Life to Old Age, of Mary Somerville | Wikipedia

Super cool that that’s why we have the word scientist.

thereconstructionists:

Not only did Scottish mathematician, science writer, and polymath Mary Fairfax Somerville (December 26, 1780—November 28, 1872) defy the era’s deep-seated bias against women in science, she was the very reason the word “scientist” was coined: When reviewing her seminal second book, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences, which Somerville wrote at the age of 54, English polymath and Trinity College master William Whewell was so impressed that he thought it rendered the term “men of science” obsolete and warranted a new, more inclusive descriptor to honor Somerville’s contribution to the field.

Reconstructionist Maria Mitchell, herself a pioneer who paved the way for women in science, captured Somerville’s singular genius in a May 1860 article for The Atlantic:

To read mathematical works is an easy task; the formulae can be learned and their meaning apprehended: to read the most profound of them, with such appreciation that one stands side by side with the great minds who originated them, requires a higher order of intellect; and far-reaching indeed is that which, pondering in the study on a few phenomena known by observation, develops the theory of worlds, traces back for ages their history, and sketches the outline of their future destiny.

Somerville came to science by way of the arts, the era’s traditional domain for young girls. When her art teacher made a passing reference to Euclid and his theories of geometry to explain perspective in painting, noting that they also illuminated the foundations of astronomy and physics, young Mary found herself mesmerized by the promise of a science so expansive and dimensional. So she pleaded with her brother’s science tutor to help her learn about Euclid. But her ascent to science was far from smooth — this early initiative was met with adamant resistance by her father, who found mathematics not only unsuitable but also sanity-jeopardizing for his daughter. Somerville recalls in her journals:

My father came home for a short time, and, somehow or other, finding out what I was about, said to my mother, ‘Peg, we must put a stop to this, or we shall have Mary in a strait jacket one of these days. There was X., who went raving mad about the longitude!’

To correct young Mary’s intellectual aberrations, her parents put her on a steady diet of illustrated ladies’ journals. But those happened to contain puzzles and logical riddles, many of which required mathematical solutions. It was in them that Mary discovered the curious symbols of algebraic equations and was once again enthralled.

Rather than thwarting her budding crush on mathematics, her parents had inadvertently turned it into a lifelong love.

Even so, however, they were bent on sending their daughter down the traditional path destined for women of the era. When she was twenty-four, Mary was married to her distant cousin, Samuel Grieg — a severe man with little faith in women’s capacities beyond their childbearing ability, who forbad Mary from pursuing her studies.

When Grieg died three years later, he left Somerville with two young children, but also with an inheritance and a freedom that opened a new horizon for learning. She soon began corresponding with the mathematician William Wallace at the University of Edinburgh, who mentored her studies in math and astronomy as she at last indulged her intellectual calling.

In 1832, Somerville married another cousin, Dr. William Somerville — a bright and gentle man who thought the world of her, encouraged her studies, and relentlessly helped her master the physical sciences. After the couple moved to London, along with their four children and the two boys from the previous marriage, Somerville met some of the era’s greatest scientific minds, from legendary astronomer William Herschel to computing pioneer Charles Babbage. It was there she became the first mathematical tutor of reconstructionist Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer, thus illustrating the beautiful daisy chain of brilliance that unfolds when the hunger for knowledge is set free from the shackles of stereotypes and cultural norms.

In 1835, Somerville and Caroline Herschel, sister of William Herschel and a trailblazing astronomer in her own right, became the first female members of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Above all, however, Somerville embodied the richness of mind and spirit that marks out the true scientist. Maria Mitchell, who had met her in 1858, poignantly observes in her Atlantic essay:

No one can make the acquaintance of this remarkable woman without increased admiration for her. The ascent of the steep and rugged path of science has not unfitted her for the drawing-room circle; the hours of devotion to close study have not been incompatible with the duties of the wife and the mother; the mind that has turned to rigid demonstration has not thereby lost its faith in the truths which figures will not prove.

Super cool that that’s why we have the word scientist.

karenhealey:

jennifergearing:

trcunning:

pippinstewardofgondor:

inebriatedpony:

Science!

what the fuck is this science bullshit

gif 1, explosive polymerization of p Nitro Aniline Video

gif 2, Sodium Polyacrylate mixed with water Video

gif 3, Sodium Acetate Video

gif 4, the smoke is vaporized wax, can still catch fire and travels back to the wick Video

gif 5, Ping Pong balls + Liquid Nitrogen in a trash can Video

gif 6, electrical treeing

gif 7, heating Mercury Thiocyanate

gif 8, ferrofluid sculpture Video

gif 9, flammable gas lit in a glass jar Video

GO HOME SCIENCE U R DRUNK.

SCIENCE CAN TOTALLY DRIVE OKAY. GIVE SCIENCE THE KEYS.

(Source: randomweas)

Roller Derby Players Swap Skin Microbes | Wired Science | Wired.com

Although presumably this is because they all practice together? Still in a way it’s kind of nice. Team microbes. It would be interesting to track the team microbes from all teams across a season.

wapiti3:

Scarlet-bodied Wasp Moth Cosmosoma myrodora photo - Ronnie Gaubert on Flickr.
 Adult males extract toxic chemicals from Dogfennel Eupatorium (Eupatorium capillifolium). * USDA plant profile Remarks These moths display warning coloration, yet the caterpillars host on non-toxic Climbing Hempweed, Mikania scandens, (family Asteraceae), a weedy vine at field margins and roadsides that can completely obscure bushes and small trees. The adult male moth extracts toxins known as “pyrrolizidine alkaloids” from Dogfennel Eupatorium (Eupatorium capillifolium) and showers these toxins over the female prior to mating. This is the only insect known to transfer a chemical defense in this way.

wapiti3:

Scarlet-bodied Wasp Moth Cosmosoma myrodora photo - Ronnie Gaubert on Flickr.





Adult males extract toxic chemicals from Dogfennel Eupatorium (Eupatorium capillifolium). * USDA plant profile
Remarks
These moths display warning coloration, yet the caterpillars host on non-toxic Climbing Hempweed, Mikania scandens, (family Asteraceae), a weedy vine at field margins and roadsides that can completely obscure bushes and small trees. The adult male moth extracts toxins known as “pyrrolizidine alkaloids” from Dogfennel Eupatorium (Eupatorium capillifolium) and showers these toxins over the female prior to mating. This is the only insect known to transfer a chemical defense in this way.

charlestonmuseum:

Maria Martin was born in Charleston in 1796, the daughter of Jacob Martin and Rebecca Solars. She lived with her sister Harriet, and her sister’s husband, John Bachman, helping to run the household and raise their nine children as Harriet was chronically ill. Two years after Harriet died in 1846, John Bachman remarried Maria. In 1831, John Bachman and John James Audubon met and became lifelong friends. Audubon stayed at the Bachman home whenever he was in Charleston - and so he met Maria. Her artistic skill was discovered and nurtured by both Audubon and Bachman, and she painted the backgrounds for many of the plates in Audubon’s Birds of North America.

These examples of her work are a 1918 donation from the family. They appear to be separated from their journal and came to us as loose pages. There is also some fire damage.

Click to view Maria’s painted silk purse recently featured in our Textile Tuesday blog. Also, learn more about Maria Martin Bachman and other women naturalists active in Charleston in this past presentation by our archivist, Jennifer Scheetz.

EPHEMERA FRIDAY: Each Friday we post a selection or small collection from our Archives. Some items may be on exhibit, some may be too fragile to display and some may be too unusual to fit into our typical Lowcountry exhibit themes. We will occasionally ask for help identifying people or places in photographs that have come to us with little or no information. We hope you enjoy our selection each week – do let us know if there’s something in particular you’d like to see on EPHEMERA FRIDAY.

rhamphotheca:

Helicoprion | Shark Relative Had Buzz Saw Mouth
by Jennifer Viegas
The world’s only animal, past or present, with a complete 360-degree spiral of teeth was Helicoprion, which sliced into prey like a buzz saw.
This shark-like fish, which lived 270 million years ago, is described in the latest issue of Biology Letters. It had one of the most unusual mouths and sets of teeth in the animal kingdom.
“When the animal closed its mouth on prey, the spiral of sharp teeth rotated backwards, like a circular saw, and slashed through the meat,” lead author Leif Tapanila, an associate professor in the Department of Geosciences at Idaho State University, told Discovery News.
Tapanila is also the research curator and head of the Earth Sciences Division at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. For the study, he and his colleagues took the first ever 3D images of Helicoprion remains.
Scientists have puzzled over this animal for more than a century, given its highly unusual “tooth whorl.” The new research sheds light on what this prehistoric marine species looked like, what its ancestry was and how it behaved…
(read more: Discovery News)                  (illustration by Ray Troll)

rhamphotheca:

Helicoprion | Shark Relative Had Buzz Saw Mouth

by Jennifer Viegas

The world’s only animal, past or present, with a complete 360-degree spiral of teeth was Helicoprion, which sliced into prey like a buzz saw.

This shark-like fish, which lived 270 million years ago, is described in the latest issue of Biology Letters. It had one of the most unusual mouths and sets of teeth in the animal kingdom.

“When the animal closed its mouth on prey, the spiral of sharp teeth rotated backwards, like a circular saw, and slashed through the meat,” lead author Leif Tapanila, an associate professor in the Department of Geosciences at Idaho State University, told Discovery News.

Tapanila is also the research curator and head of the Earth Sciences Division at the Idaho Museum of Natural History. For the study, he and his colleagues took the first ever 3D images of Helicoprion remains.

Scientists have puzzled over this animal for more than a century, given its highly unusual “tooth whorl.” The new research sheds light on what this prehistoric marine species looked like, what its ancestry was and how it behaved…

(read more: Discovery News)                  (illustration by Ray Troll)

  • me: All scientists are hipsters, that's why they wear glasses.
  • husband: No.
  • me: "I stopped working on electromagnetic induction. It was too current."
  • husband: No.
  • me: "I used to have a passion for oceanography but I got sick of talking about the mainstream."
  • husband: No!
  • me: "Of course I'm not a mathematician. Calculus-based models of the universe are SO derivative."
  • husband: ...
  • me: "I'm an expert on geothermal vents--"
  • husband: Oh my God.
  • me: "--They're probably too deep for you."
Feb 8
memoryblocks:

waffleguppies:

obesealpaca:

do you think he knows

What I find really astonishing isn’t that a giant land snail managed to earn a doctorate, but that he managed to land a national TV spot despite displaying this kind of egregious, disrespectful behaviour towards his co-host.

  #for god’s sake dr. fisher #get off the poor man’s face #you’re a snail of science #act like it

memoryblocks:

waffleguppies:

obesealpaca:

do you think he knows

What I find really astonishing isn’t that a giant land snail managed to earn a doctorate, but that he managed to land a national TV spot despite displaying this kind of egregious, disrespectful behaviour towards his co-host.

(Source: 4est)

nowisgreater:

vondell-swain:

at the end of All Yesterdays (the extremely good book about imagining and illustrating dinosaurs in complex speculative ways i was talking about yesterday) there’s a section where they prove the point about the fact that we need to be more open to imagining skin coverings and fat/cartilage deposits by illustrating modern-day animals as if a nonhuman paleontologist from millions of years in the future reconstructed them using the just-skin-stretched-over-the-skeleton-and-muscles method that unimaginative paleoartists use with dinosaurs

with results like:

image

and

image

and

image

and i love it so much because it absolutely unquestionably proves the point the book is making

Whoa, this is really cool. I’d never thought about that before.

(Source: itsvondell)